EU warns Poland is “clearly on Polexit path” as bloc unity balances | World | New

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Relations between Brussels and Poland, an EU member state, have been strained in recent years, illustrated by a recent dispute over justice in Warsaw. The country’s government has told the EU it will close a chamber of its supreme court devoted to the discipline of judges, backing down to demands from the European Commission after a long row. The EU and Poland have been at odds for years because the ruling Warsaw party has been accused of compromising the independence of its legal systems. Poland as well as Hungary also fought with other member states for the attitude of their respective governments towards LGBTQ rights.

Manfred Weber, Germany’s influential MEP, tweeted last month that Poland was about to leave the bloc.

He said: “Very concerned about the decision of the Polish Constitutional Court.

“This should serve as a warning to all Poles who are truly pro-European and want a European future for their children and grandchildren: your government is clearly on the path to Polexit.”

Hungary’s place in the bloc was also questioned by Dutch leader Mark Rutte in July amid a row over Viktor Orban’s anti-LGBTQ legislation.

In Poland, the opposition leader warned in December that the government’s anti-EU rhetoric risked Polexit.

Borys Budka compared the actions of Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki to those of David Cameron in the UK, who inadvertently kicked off the Brexit process by calling a referendum in 2016.

He said: “Morawiecki could go down in history as Cameron, who may have unwittingly started the Brexit process, and so could Morawiecki, by vetoing the budget, and could start the Polexit process.”

Mr Morawiecki criticized the EU, warning recently that the bloc risked becoming an “oligarchy”.

Meanwhile, President Andrzej Duda has used harsh terms to describe the EU, calling it an “imaginary community of little importance to us”.

In November last year, opposition MP Małgorzata Kidawa-Błońska warned: “It is time to sound the alarm bells.

“What happened in the UK starts here. We have to stop it.

Former European Council president and Polish politician Donald Tusk warned last month that Poland and Hungary’s repeated clashes with Brussels could cause the bloc to collapse.

He said: “If we find more countries like this that insist on damaging … the European Union, it could just mean the end of this organization.

One of the most tense clashes between Poland, Hungary and the EU came last year after the two countries vetoed the bloc’s coronavirus recovery fund.

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In November last year, opposition MP Małgorzata Kidawa-Błońska warned: “It is time to sound the alarm bells.

“What happened in the UK starts here. We have to stop it.

Former European Council president and Polish politician Donald Tusk warned last month that Poland and Hungary’s repeated clashes with Brussels could cause the bloc to collapse.

He said: “If we find more countries like this that insist on damaging … the European Union, it could just mean the end of this organization.

One of the most tense clashes between Poland, Hungary and the EU came last year after the two countries vetoed the bloc’s coronavirus recovery fund.

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The leaders pushed for a rule of law mechanism, designed to penalize countries whose governments had undermined democracy.

But because the stimulus fund needed unanimous support, Hungary and Poland were able to block the package.

After days of intense negotiations, a compromise has finally been found which means that the £ 1.6 trillion in stimulus funds can now be distributed to the EU27.

While Polish leaders have criticized Brussels, opinion polls in the country have shown that 80% of people are in favor of EU membership.

The Polish economy is also dependent on the bloc. In 2018, almost 80% of exports were destined for the EU and 58% of Polish imports came from the EU internal market.

EU funds and participation in the single market have benefited Poles and increased their wealth – per capita income fell from 45% of the EU average in 2004 to 70% in 2017, according to Eurostat.


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